Texas Health and Safety Code

As effective September 1, 2021

Sec. 501.002: Hazardous Substance Described

(a) A hazardous substance is:

(1) a substance or mixture of substances that is toxic, corrosive, extremely flammable, flammable, combustible, an irritant, or a strong sensitizer, or that generates pressure through decomposition, heat, or other means, if the substance or mixture of substances may cause substantial personal injury or substantial illness during or as a proximate result of any customary or reasonably foreseeable handling or use, including reasonably foreseeable ingestion by children;

(2) a toy or other article, other than clothing, that is intended for use by a child and that presents an electrical, mechanical, or thermal hazard; or

(3) a radioactive substance designated as a hazardous substance under Section 501.003.

(b) A substance is corrosive if, when in contact with living tissue, it causes destruction of that tissue by chemical action. A chemical action on an inanimate surface is not corrosive for the purpose of this section.

(c) An article is an electrical hazard if, in normal use or when subjected to reasonably foreseeable damage or abuse, it may cause, because of its design or manufacture, personal injury or illness by electric shock.

(d) A substance or article is extremely flammable, flammable, or combustible if it is defined as extremely flammable, flammable, or combustible by rule adopted by the executive commissioner. The executive commissioner shall define the terms as they are defined by the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1261 et seq.), as amended, and by federal regulations adopted under that Act. The terms each have the meaning assigned by the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1261 et seq.) and by federal regulations adopted under that Act, as of September 1, 2001.

(e) A substance is an irritant if it is noncorrosive and if, on immediate, prolonged, or repeated contact with normal living tissue, it induces a local inflammatory reaction.

(f) An article is a mechanical hazard if, in normal use or when subjected to reasonably foreseeable damage or abuse, it presents, because of its design or manufacture, an unreasonable risk of personal injury or illness:

(1) from fracture, fragmentation, or disassembly of the article;

(2) from propulsion of the article or a part or accessory of the article;

(3) from points or other protrusions, surfaces, edges, openings, or closures;

(4) from moving parts;

(5) from lack or insufficiency of controls to reduce or stop motion;

(6) as a result of self-adhering characteristics of the article;

(7) because the article or a part or accessory of the article may be aspirated or ingested;

(8) because of instability; or

(9) because of any other aspect of the article's design or manufacture.

(g) A substance is radioactive if it emits ionizing radiation.

(h) A substance is a strong sensitizer if, when on normal living tissue, it causes, through an allergic or photodynamic process, a hypersensitivity that becomes evident on reapplication of the same substance.

(i) An article is a thermal hazard if, in normal use or when subject to reasonably foreseeable damage or abuse, it presents, because of its design or manufacture, an unreasonable risk of personal injury or illness because of heat, including heat from heated parts, substances, or surfaces.

(j) A substance is toxic if it is capable of producing personal injury or illness to any person through ingestion, inhalation, or absorption through any body surface and it is not radioactive.

(k) The following are not hazardous substances:

(1) a pesticide subject to Chapter 76, Agriculture Code, or to the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. Section 136 et seq.);

(2) a food, drug, or cosmetic subject to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. Section 301 et seq.) or Chapter 431 (Texas Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act);

(3) a beverage complying with or subject to the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (27 U.S.C. Section 201 et seq.);

(4) a substance intended for use as fuel that is stored in a container and used in the heating, cooking, or refrigeration system of a private residence; and

(5) source material, special nuclear material, or by-product material as defined in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. Chapter 23) and regulations issued under that Act by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Comments

Acts 1989, 71st Leg., ch. 678, Sec. 1, eff. Sept. 1, 1989. Amended by Acts 2001, 77th Leg., ch. 360, Sec. 2, eff. Sept. 1, 2001.

Amended by:

Acts 2015, 84th Leg., R.S., Ch. 1 (S.B. 219), Sec. 3.1260, eff. April 2, 2015.